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Building interactive clinical case studies using and evaluating online software.

Sawdon, M. and Curtis, F. (2010) 'Building interactive clinical case studies using and evaluating online software.', Association for Medical Education in Europe (AMEE) Conference 2010 Glasgow, UK, 4-8 Sep 2010.

Abstract

Background: It has been shown that didactic lectures do not promote effective learning or retention of knowledge. Undergraduate students often do not understand the relevance of the basic sciences taught in a didactic manner. Summary of work: We are creating online, branching, interactive clinical case tutorials to ultimately enhance understanding of the clinical relevance of the basic sciences. The initial design stage considers the strengths and weaknesses of three tools in achieving the 'branching' style of tutorial required. These are Labyrinth, Quandary and vpSim. Summary of results: Evaluation of this study is currently underway. We will present a comparison of these tools from the usability (student) perspective and data on the ease of creation, capabilities and accessibility. Further analysis will assess the potential for the tutorials to enhance clinical understanding of basic sciences. Conclusions: Evaluation of these tools will guide future development of interactive case tutorials by fellow educators. Take home message: The provision of interactive clinical cases, at timely points throughout the first year of Undergraduate Medicine, will allow students to apply their knowledge of the basic sciences to a real clinical case.

Item Type:Conference item (Paper)
Full text:PDF (Abstract) - Presentation (90Kb)
Status:Public
Publisher Web site:http://www.amee.org/index.asp?pg=132
Record Created:05 Aug 2010 11:20
Last Modified:17 May 2012 10:20

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