Cookies

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. By continuing to browse this repository, you give consent for essential cookies to be used. You can read more about our Privacy and Cookie Policy.


Durham Research Online
You are in:

Developing workable research methods : lessons from a pilot study with vulnerable participants and complex assessments.

Jones, S.E. and Hamilton, S. and Perry, L. and O'Malley, C. and Halton, C. (2011) 'Developing workable research methods : lessons from a pilot study with vulnerable participants and complex assessments.', Journal of research in nursing., 16 (4). pp. 307-318.

Abstract

Following acute stroke, deterioration in nutritional status and weight loss is common; few studies have investigated this, perhaps due to difficulties with recruitment and completion of complex assessments with stroke patients. This study reports the feasibility of a study protocol to determine predictors of nutritional intake in stroke patients. The aim of the study was to test the feasibility of a protocol to measure taste and smell function, and explore links with dietary intake following stroke. Patients were recruited from one Acute Stroke Unit in 2007/8. Data were collected at three time-points and entailed standardised validated assessments of taste and smell function, diet, appetite and mood state. Recruitment of this vulnerable population to a demanding assessment schedule was challenging. Of a cohort of 166 admissions, six were recruited and complete data collected from four participants. Slow recruitment was largely due to exacting inclusion criteria and rapid hospital discharge. Those who completed all assessments reported the schedule as tolerable and acceptable. This study illustrated the difficulties of recruiting this vulnerable population. Identification of reasons for slow recruitment facilitated development of measures to address them. It was possible to format a complex and lengthy assessment schedule to be acceptable to vulnerable participants.

Item Type:Article
Full text:PDF - Accepted Version (270Kb)
Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1744987110380335
Publisher statement:The final definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal Journal of research in nursing 16/4 2011 © SAGE Publications Ltd by SAGE Publications Ltd at the Journal of research in nursing page: http://jrn.sagepub.com/ on SAGE Journals Online: http://online.sagepub.com/
Record Created:01 Oct 2010 14:20
Last Modified:19 Jan 2012 15:37

Social bookmarking: del.icio.usConnoteaBibSonomyCiteULikeFacebookTwitterExport: EndNote, Zotero | BibTex
Usage statisticsLook up in GoogleScholar | Find in a UK Library