Cookies

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Otherwise, we'll assume you're OK to continue.


Durham Research Online
You are in:

Language and theory of mind in autism spectrum disorder : the relationship between complement syntax and false belief task performance.

Lind, S.E. and Bowler, D.M. (2009) 'Language and theory of mind in autism spectrum disorder : the relationship between complement syntax and false belief task performance.', Journal of autism and developmental disorders., 39 (6). pp. 929-937.

Abstract

This study aimed to test the hypothesis that children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) use their knowledge of complement syntax as a means of “hacking out” solutions to false belief tasks, despite lacking a representational theory of mind (ToM). Participants completed a “memory for complements” task, a measure of receptive vocabulary, and traditional location change and unexpected contents false belief tasks. Consistent with predictions, the correlation between complement syntax score and location change task performance was significantly stronger within the ASD group than within the comparison group. However, contrary to predictions, complement syntax score was not significantly correlated with unexpected contents task performance within either group. Possible explanations for this pattern of results are considered.

Item Type:Article
Keywords:Autism spectrum disorder, Complement syntax, False belief, Language, Theory of mind.
Full text:PDF - Accepted Version (69Kb)
Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10803-009-0702-y
Publisher statement:The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com
Record Created:12 Oct 2010 11:05
Last Modified:18 Nov 2010 10:24

Social bookmarking: del.icio.usConnoteaBibSonomyCiteULikeFacebookTwitterExport: EndNote, Zotero | BibTex
Usage statisticsLook up in GoogleScholar | Find in a UK Library