Cookies

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. By continuing to browse this repository, you give consent for essential cookies to be used. You can read more about our Privacy and Cookie Policy.


Durham Research Online
You are in:

Conditional inference and advanced mathematical study : further evidence.

Inglis, M. and Simpson, A. (2009) 'Conditional inference and advanced mathematical study : further evidence.', Educational studies in mathematics., 72 (2). pp. 185-198.

Abstract

In this paper, we examine the support given for the ‘theory of formal discipline’ by Inglis and Simpson (Educational Studies Mathematics 67:187–204, 2008). This theory, which is widely accepted by mathematicians and curriculum bodies, suggests that the study of advanced mathematics develops general thinking skills and, in particular, conditional reasoning skills. We further examine the idea that the differences between the conditional reasoning behaviour of mathematics and arts undergraduates reported by Inglis and Simpson may be put down to different levels of general intelligence in the two groups. The studies reported in this paper call into question this suggestion, but they also cast doubt on a straightforward version of the theory of formal discipline itself (at least with respect to university study). The paper concludes by suggesting that either a pre-university formal discipline effect or a filtering effect on ‘thinking dispositions’ may give a better account for the findings.

Item Type:Article
Keywords:Advanced mathematical thinking, Conditional inference, Logic, Reasoning, Theory of formal discipline, Thinking dispositions.
Full text:PDF - Accepted Version (178Kb)
Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10649-009-9187-z
Publisher statement:The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com
Record Created:05 Nov 2010 14:20
Last Modified:24 May 2012 11:49

Social bookmarking: del.icio.usConnoteaBibSonomyCiteULikeFacebookTwitterExport: EndNote, Zotero | BibTex
Usage statisticsLook up in GoogleScholar | Find in a UK Library