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Let them eat Shakespeare : prescribed authors and the National Curriculum.

Ward, S.C. and Connolly, R. (2008) 'Let them eat Shakespeare : prescribed authors and the National Curriculum.', The curriculum journal., 19 (4). pp. 293-307.

Abstract

In this article, we examine the debate that surrounds prescribed reading lists in the English National Curriculum. In particular, we attempt to locate the role which ideas about heritage and social and moral values have played in constructing this debate. We begin by examining the English National Curriculum's origin in the 1980s as a conservative exercise in stemming cultural crisis, and the discourse about literature's role in the curriculum which this helped construct. We then examine how this discourse has influenced, and continues to influence, the educational policy of prescribing a list of authors and consider the assumptions that are embedded in this policy. Finally, we reflect upon how the material conditions of the classroom provide a site of resistance, or difficulty, for the officially sanctioned discourse concerning literature's role in the curriculum.

Item Type:Article
Keywords:Canon, Cox Report, English teachers, National Curriculum, Prescribed authors.
Full text:PDF - Accepted Version (413Kb)
Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09585170802509880
Publisher statement:This is an electronic version of an article published in Ward, S.C. and Connolly, R. (2008) 'Let them eat Shakespeare : prescribed authors and the National Curriculum.', The curriculum journal., 19 (4). pp. 293-307. The curriculum journal is available online at: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/ with the open URL of your article.
Record Created:07 Feb 2011 15:50
Last Modified:01 Mar 2011 11:56

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