Cookies

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Otherwise, we'll assume you're OK to continue.


Durham Research Online
You are in:

Stigma and psychiatric illness : a survey of attitude of medical students and doctors in Lahore, Pakistan.

Naeem, F. and Ayub, M. and Javed, Z. and Irfan, M. and Haral, F. and Kingdon, D. (2006) 'Stigma and psychiatric illness : a survey of attitude of medical students and doctors in Lahore, Pakistan.', Journal of Ayub Medical College Abbottabad (JAMC), 18 (3). pp. 46-49.

Abstract

Background: The stigma attached to mental illness in the West is now well recognised. There is however, only limited information available on this topic from the developing countries. Measurement of stigma among medical students and doctors is straightforward to carry out allowing targeted work to educate doctors in countries with few resources. This study was carried out to assess the attitude of medical students and doctors, attending medical colleges in Lahore, Pakistan. Methods: A survey was circulated among the medical students and the doctors of the three medical colleges in Lahore, Pakistan. 294 (59%) of the 500 survey forms sent out were returned. Results: Just over half of the respondents held negative attitudes towards people with schizophrenia, depression, drug and alcohol disorders. However, most had favourable views of the recovery and treatability of the mental disorders. Conclusions: The views held by the medical students and the doctors in Lahore, Pakistan are broadly similar to the opinions expressed by the medical students and doctors in the UK.

Item Type:Article
Full text:Full text not available from this repository.
Publisher Web site:http://www.ayubmed.edu.pk/JAMC/PAST/18-3/
Record Created:22 Jun 2011 11:05
Last Modified:06 Jul 2011 11:50

Social bookmarking: del.icio.usConnoteaBibSonomyCiteULikeFacebookTwitterExport: EndNote, Zotero | BibTex
Usage statisticsLook up in GoogleScholar | Find in a UK Library