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Durham Research Online
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Individual differences in infants' emotional resonance to a peer in distress : self-other awareness and emotion regulation.

Geangu, E. and Benga, O. and Stahl, D. and Striano, T. (2011) 'Individual differences in infants' emotional resonance to a peer in distress : self-other awareness and emotion regulation.', Social development., 20 (3). pp. 450-470.

Abstract

In this study, relations between emotional resonance responses to another’s distress, emotion regulation and self-other discrimination were investigated in infants 3-, 6-, and 9-month-old. We measured the emotional reactions to the pain cry of a peer, along with the ability to regulate emotions and to discriminate between self and other body movements. We found evidence that infants do regulate their emotional resonance responses to another’s distress. This relation is age specific, with younger infants using more primitive self-soothing behaviors, while in older participants attentional based strategies relate to affect sharing reactions. Only 9-month-old infants have shown self-other differentiation abilities, and these were significantly connected to their emotions in response to a peer’s distress. These findings have implications for our understanding of early empathy development.

Item Type:Article
Keywords:Empathy, Infancy, Emotion regulation, Self perception.
Full text:Full text not available from this repository.
Publisher Web site:http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9507.2010.00596.x
Record Created:14 Oct 2011 10:20
Last Modified:19 Oct 2011 12:06

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