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Autoethnography and academic identity : glimpsing business school doppelgangers.

Learmonth, M. and Humphreys, M. (2012) 'Autoethnography and academic identity : glimpsing business school doppelgangers.', Organization., 19 (1). pp. 99-117.

Abstract

Throughout our adult lives we have both been haunted by a certain sense of doubleness—a feeling of dislocation, of being in the wrong place, of playing a role. Inspired by Stevenson’s novel Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde we explore this doubleness through evocative, dual, autoethnographic accounts of academic conferences. By analysing our stories in an iterative process of writing, reading, rewriting and rereading, we seek to extend the reach of much recent autoethnographic research. Presenting ourselves as objects of research, we show how, for us, contemporary academic identity is problematic in that it necessarily involves being (at least) ‘both’ Jekyll and Hyde. In providing readings of our stories, we show how autoethnography can make two contributions to the study of identity in organizations. The first is that autoethnographic accounts may provide scholars with new forms of empirical material—case studies in identity work. The second contribution highlights the value of experimenting with unorthodox approaches—such as explicitly using novels and other literary sources to study identity.

Item Type:Article
Full text:PDF - Accepted Version (347Kb)
Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1350508411398056
Publisher statement:The final definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal Organization, 19/1, 2012 © SAGE Publications Ltd by SAGE Publications Ltd at the <Journal Title> page: http://org.sagepub.com/ on SAGE Journals Online: http://online.sagepub.com/
Record Created:10 Jan 2012 10:35
Last Modified:06 Jan 2013 00:30

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