Cookies

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Otherwise, we'll assume you're OK to continue.


Durham Research Online
You are in:

Cost utility of behavioural activation delivered by the non-specialist.

Ekers, D. and Godfrey, C. and Gilbody, S. and Parrott, S. and Richards, D. A. and Hammond, D. and Hayes, A. (2011) 'Cost utility of behavioural activation delivered by the non-specialist.', British journal of psychiatry., 199 (6). pp. 510-511.

Abstract

Behavioural activation by non-specialists appears effective in the treatment of depression. We examined incremental cost-effectiveness of behavioural activation (n = 24) v. treatment as usual (n = 23) in a randomised controlled trial. Intention-to-treat analyses indicated a quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) difference in favour of behavioural activation of 0.20 (95% CI 0.01–0.39, P = 0.042), incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of £5756 per QALY and a 97% probability that behavioural activation is more cost-effective at a threshold value of £20 000. Results are promising for dissemination of behavioural activation but require replication in a larger study.

Item Type:Article
Full text:Full text not available from this repository.
Publisher Web site:http://dx.doi.org/10.1192/bjp.bp.110.090266
Record Created:24 Jan 2012 12:20
Last Modified:03 Jan 2013 09:46

Social bookmarking: del.icio.usConnoteaBibSonomyCiteULikeFacebookTwitterExport: EndNote, Zotero | BibTex
Usage statisticsLook up in GoogleScholar | Find in a UK Library