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Uses and recycling of brick in medieval English buildings : insights from the application of luminescence dating and new avenues for further research.

Bailiff, I.K. and Blain, S. and Graves, C.P. and Gurling, T. and Semple, S. (2010) 'Uses and recycling of brick in medieval English buildings : insights from the application of luminescence dating and new avenues for further research.', Archaeological journal., 167 (1). pp. 165-196.

Abstract

Luminescence dating has been applied to ceramic bricks sampled from a selection of English medieval ecclesiastical and secular buildings in Essex, Kent and Lincolnshire, ranging in age from the fourth to the late sixteenth centuries. The results obtained for the Anglo-Saxon churches, which included Brixworth, confirmed the reuse of Roman brick in all cases. The dates for the earliest medieval brick type indicate that brick making was reintroduced during the eleventh century, a century earlier than previously accepted, and dates for bricks from the same secular Tudor building indicate that the practice of recycling of building materials during the late medieval period was also applied to brick.

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:Published on behalf of the Royal Archaeological Institute.
Full text:PDF - Accepted Version (648Kb)
Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00665983.2010.11020796
Publisher statement:This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis Group in The archaeological journal in 2010, available online at: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/00665983.2010.11020796
Record Created:03 Apr 2012 14:35
Last Modified:08 Jan 2016 17:50

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