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The role and effectiveness of public-private partnerships (NHS LIFT) in the development of enhanced Primary Care services and premises : Report for the National Institute for Health Research Service Delivery and Organisation programme.

Beck, M. and Toms, S. and Mannion, R. and Brown, S. and Fitzsimmins, D. and Lunt, N. and Greener, L. (2010) 'The role and effectiveness of public-private partnerships (NHS LIFT) in the development of enhanced Primary Care services and premises : Report for the National Institute for Health Research Service Delivery and Organisation programme.', Project Report. NIHR Evaluation, Trials and Studies Coordinating Centre (NETSCC), London.

Abstract

The research project analysed the role and effectiveness of LIFT via a multi-method study which included semi-structured interviews with policy elites and users, as well as case studies and an exploratory analysis of the financial characteristics of three LIFT Companies. While the team felt that it was able to identify key aspects relating to the advantages and drawbacks surrounding LIFT, the representativeness of the study was adversely affected by a reluctance of PCTs to participate in the case study analysis and commercial confidentiality restrictions.

Item Type:Monograph (Project Report)
Additional Information:SDO Project (08/1618/156)
Keywords:PCTs, Enhanced primary care premises/ services, Collaboration, Private sector partners, PFI procurement, Innovation, Best practice, Organisational effectiveness, Cost effectiveness, organisational culture, Cultural and behavioural factors, Stakeholder sat
Full text:Full text not available from this repository.
Publisher Web site:http://www.netscc.ac.uk/hsdr/projdetails.php?ref=08-1618-156
Record Created:05 Jul 2012 12:20
Last Modified:11 Jul 2012 12:27

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