Cookies

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. By continuing to browse this repository, you give consent for essential cookies to be used. You can read more about our Privacy and Cookie Policy.


Durham Research Online
You are in:

The spatial implications of homeworking : a Lefebvrian approach to the rewards and challenges of home-based work.

Wapshott, R. and Mallett, O. (2012) 'The spatial implications of homeworking : a Lefebvrian approach to the rewards and challenges of home-based work.', Organization., 19 (1). pp. 63-79.

Abstract

In this theoretical article we propose an approach to the spatial implications of homeworking derived from the work of social theorist Henri Lefebvre. By highlighting the processes involved in the inherently contested and (re)constructed nature of space in the demarcated home/work environment we draw on Lefebvre to suggest a collapse of this demarcation. We consider the impact of such a collapse on questions relating to the rewards and challenges of home-based work for both workers and their co-residents. In contrast to our approach to the spatial implications of home-based work derived from Lefebvre, we argue that a traditional, Euclidean conception of space risks ignoring the important, symbolic nature of social space to the detriment of both the effective research and practice of homeworking.

Item Type:Article
Keywords:Boundaries, Co-residents, Homeworking Lefebvre, Space, Teleworking.
Full text:PDF - Accepted Version (184Kb)
Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1350508411405376
Publisher statement:The final definitive version of this article has been published in the journal Organization, 19/1, 2012 © <SAGE Publications Ltd by SAGE Publications Ltd at the Organization page: http://org.sagepub.com/ on SAGE Journals Online: http://online.sagepub.com/
Record Created:31 Aug 2012 09:20
Last Modified:06 Jan 2013 00:30

Social bookmarking: del.icio.usConnoteaBibSonomyCiteULikeFacebookTwitterExport: EndNote, Zotero | BibTex
Usage statisticsLook up in GoogleScholar | Find in a UK Library