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Adaptation of eye movements to simulated hemianopia in reading and visual exploration : transfer or specificity ?

Schuett, S. and Kentridge, R.W. and Zihl, J. and Heywood, C.A. (2009) 'Adaptation of eye movements to simulated hemianopia in reading and visual exploration : transfer or specificity ?', Neuropsychologia., 47 (7). pp. 1712-1720.

Abstract

Reading and visual exploration impairments in unilateral homonymous hemianopia are well-established clinical phenomena. Spontaneous adaptation of eye-movements to the visual field defect leads to improved reading and visual exploration performance. Yet, it is still unclear whether oculomotor adaptation to visual field loss is task-specific or whether there is a transfer of adaptation-related improvements between reading and visual exploration. We therefore simulated unilateral homonymous hemianopia in healthy participants and explored the specificity with which oculomotor adaptation to this pure visual-sensory dysfunction during uninstructed reading or visual exploration practice leads to improvements in both abilities. Our findings demonstrate that there is no transfer of adaptation-related changes of eye-movements and performance improvements between reading and visual exploration. Efficient oculomotor adaptation to visual field loss is highly specific and task-dependent.

Item Type:Article
Keywords:Hemianopia, Simulation, Eye-movements, Adaptation, Reading, Visual exploration.
Full text:Full text not available from this repository.
Publisher Web site:http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2009.02.010
Record Created:25 Sep 2012 16:20
Last Modified:25 Sep 2012 17:05

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