Cookies

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. By continuing to browse this repository, you give consent for essential cookies to be used. You can read more about our Privacy and Cookie Policy.


Durham Research Online
You are in:

No rubber stamp : Hegel's constitutional monarch.

Brooks, Thom (2007) 'No rubber stamp : Hegel's constitutional monarch.', History of political thought., 28 (1). pp. 91-119.

Abstract

Perhaps one of the most controversial aspects of Hegel's Philosophy of Right for contemporary interpreters is its discussion of the constitutional monarch. This is true despite the general agreement amongst virtually all interpreters that Hegel's monarch is no more powerful than modern constitutional monarchs and is an institution worthy of little attention or concern. In this article, I will examine whether or not it matters who is the monarch and what domestic and foreign powers he has. I argue against the virtual consensus of recent interpreters that Hegel's monarch is far more powerful than has been understood previously. In part, Hegel's monarch is perhaps even more powerful than Hegel himself may have realized and I will demonstrate certain inconsistencies with some of his claims. My reading represents a distinctive break from the virtual consensus, without endorsing the view that Hegel was a totalitarian.

Item Type:Article
Full text:(VoR) Version of Record
Download PDF
(821Kb)
Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/imp/hpt/2007/00000028/00000001/art00004
Publisher statement:Copyright © Imprint Academic 2007
Date accepted:No date available
Date deposited:01 May 2013
Date of first online publication:2007
Date first made open access:No date available

Save or Share this output

Export:
Export
Look up in GoogleScholar