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Detribalizing the later prehistoric past : concepts of tribes in Iron Age and Roman studies.

Moore, T. (2011) 'Detribalizing the later prehistoric past : concepts of tribes in Iron Age and Roman studies.', Journal of social archaeology., 11 (3). pp. 334-360.

Abstract

In studies of the Iron Age and Early Roman periods the concept of the ‘tribe’ has long been a social framework upon which to hang the archaeological record. Yet, despite widespread recognition of the complex social processes and shifting identities during Rome’s expansion, the nature of ‘tribes’ in Late Iron Age Britain and the suitability of this term for describing societies at this time has been largely ignored. This article examines why the term ‘tribe’ has retained its prominence in archaeological studies despite being widely critiqued by anthropologists. Through an examination of the historiography of the term I argue that the traditional tribal model was born of nineteenth-century perceptions of social systems and that neither archaeological evidence nor classical sources support many of its current connotations. The names in classical sources should instead be regarded as reflecting the emergence of new social and political entities in the later Iron Age.

Item Type:Article
Keywords:Civitas, Ethnography, Historiography, Identity, Iron Age, Roman conquest, Tribe.
Full text:(AM) Accepted Manuscript
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Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1469605311403861
Publisher statement:The final definitive version of this article has been published in the journal Journal of Social Archaeology, 11, 3 2011 © SAGE Publications Ltd at the Journal of Social Archaeology page: http://jsa.sagepub.com/content/11/3/334 on SAGE Journals Online: http://online.sagepub.com/
Date accepted:No date available
Date deposited:06 March 2014
Date of first online publication:October 2011
Date first made open access:No date available

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