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A Q-methodology study of parental understandings of infant immunisation : implications for health-care advice.

Harvey, H. and Good, J. and Mason, J. M. and Reissland, N. (2015) 'A Q-methodology study of parental understandings of infant immunisation : implications for health-care advice.', Journal of health psychology., 20 (11). pp. 1451-1462.

Abstract

This study used Q-methodology to explore systematically parental judgements about infant immunisation. A total of 45 parents completed a 31-statement Q-sort. Data were collected after vaccination in general practitioner practices or a private day nursery. Q factor analysis revealed four distinct viewpoints: a duty to immunise based on medical benefits, child-orientated protection based on parental belief, concern and distress and surprise at non-compliance. Additionally, there was a common view among parents that they did not regret immunising their children. Implications of these results are discussed in terms of health-care policy and future research.

Item Type:Article
Full text:(AM) Accepted Manuscript
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Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1359105313513622
Publisher statement:Harvey, H. and Good, J. and Mason, J. M. and Reissland, N. (2015) 'A Q-methodology study of parental understandings of infanct immunisation : implications for health-care advice.', Journal of health psychology., 20 (11). pp. 1451-1462. © The Author(s) 2013. Reprinted by permission of SAGE Publications.
Date accepted:No date available
Date deposited:13 May 2014
Date of first online publication:12 December 2013
Date first made open access:No date available

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