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Implications of the data revolution for statistics education.

Ridgway, Jim (2016) 'Implications of the data revolution for statistics education.', International statistical review., 84 (3). pp. 528-549.

Abstract

There has never been a more exciting time to be involved in statistics. Emerging data sources provide new sorts of evidence, provoke new sorts of questions, make possible new sorts of answers and shape the ways that evidence is used to influence policy, public opinion and business practices. Significant developments include open data, big data, data visualisation and the rise of data-driven journalism. These developments are changing the nature of the evidence that is available, the ways in which it is presented and used and the skills needed for its interpretation. Educators should place less emphasis on small samples and linear models and more emphasis on large samples, multivariate description and data visualisation. Techniques used to analyse big data need to be taught. The increasing diversity of data usage requires deeper conceptual analysis in the curriculum; this should include explorations of the functions of modelling, and the politics of data and ethics. The data revolution can invigorate the existing curriculum by exemplifying the perils of biassed sampling, corruption of measures and modelling failures. Students need to learn to think statistically and to develop an aesthetic for data handling and modelling based on solving practical problems.

Item Type:Article
Keywords:Statistics education, Modelling, Open data, Big data, Visualisation, Data-driven journalism, Curriculum, Statistical literacy, Change.
Full text:(VoR) Version of Record
Available under License - Creative Commons Attribution.
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Full text:(VoR) Version of Record
Available under License - Creative Commons Attribution.
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Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:https://doi.org/10.1111/insr.12110
Publisher statement:© 2015 The Authors. International Statistical Review published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of International Statistical Institute. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Date accepted:09 June 2015
Date deposited:29 July 2015
Date of first online publication:29 July 2015
Date first made open access:No date available

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