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Regional power and local ecologies : accumulated population trends and human impacts in the northern Fertile Crescent.

Lawrence, D. and Philip, G. and Wilkinson, K. and Buylaert, J.P. and Murray, A.S. and Thompson, W. and Wilkinson, T.J. (2017) 'Regional power and local ecologies : accumulated population trends and human impacts in the northern Fertile Crescent.', Quaternary international., 437 (Part B). pp. 60-81.

Abstract

Archaeological data tend to be gathered at the local level: human agency also operates at this scale. By combining data from multiple surveys conducted within a larger area, it is possible to use local datasets to obtain a perspective on regional trends in settlement, population, and human activity. Here we employ data derived from nine archaeological surveys in the northern and western regions of the Fertile Crescent (west and north Syria, SE Turkey, and northern Iraq) to show how local trends aggregate to create a general proxy record of settlement and regional population. In addition, we use geoarchaeological data from a region extending from Homs in the west to northern Iraq in the east to outline historical trends in alluvial fill development. Both settlement and alluviation trends are then related to palaeoclimate proxy data from Soreq Cave and Lake Van. Settlement, geoarchaeological signatures and climate are then examined side by side in order to assess long-term human interactions.

Item Type:Article
Keywords:Fertile crescent, Local ecology, Landscape archaeology, Settlement archaeology, Scale.
Full text:(AM) Accepted Manuscript
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Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.quaint.2015.06.026
Publisher statement:NOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Quaternary International. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Quaternary International, Volume 437, Part B, 5 May 2017, Pages 60–81, 10.1016/j.quaint.2015.06.026.
Date accepted:07 May 2015
Date deposited:15 June 2015
Date of first online publication:15 July 2015
Date first made open access:15 July 2016

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