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Articulated Wiwaxia from the Cambrian Stage 3 Xiaoshiba Lagerstätte.

Yang, J. and Smith, M.R. and Lan, T. and Hou, J.-B. and Zhang, X.-G. (2014) 'Articulated Wiwaxia from the Cambrian Stage 3 Xiaoshiba Lagerstätte.', Scientific reports., 4 . p. 4643.

Abstract

Wiwaxia is a bizarre metazoan that has been interpreted as a primitive mollusc and as a polychaete annelid worm. Extensive material from the Burgess Shale provides a detailed picture of its morphology and ontogeny, but the fossil record outside this lagerstätte is scarce, and complete wiwaxiids are particularly rare. Here we report small articulated specimens of Wiwaxia foliosa sp. nov. from the Xiaoshiba fauna (Cambrian Stage 3, Hongjingshao Formation, Kunming, south China). Although spines are absent, the fossils' sclerites – like those of W. corrugata – are symmetrically arranged in five distinct zones. They form rows across the body, and were individually added and shed throughout growth to retain an approximately symmetrical body shape. Their development pattern suggests a molluscan affinity. The basic body plan of wiwaxiids is fundamentally conserved across two continents through Cambrian Stages 3–5 – revealing morphological stasis in the wake of the Cambrian explosion.

Item Type:Article
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Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep04643
Publisher statement:This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. The images in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the image credit; if the image is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder in order to reproduce the image. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
Date accepted:21 March 2014
Date deposited:17 November 2015
Date of first online publication:10 April 2014
Date first made open access:No date available

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