Cookies

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. By continuing to browse this repository, you give consent for essential cookies to be used. You can read more about our Privacy and Cookie Policy.


Durham Research Online
You are in:

Logistics at work : trucks, containers and the friction of circulation in the UK.

Gregson, N. (2015) 'Logistics at work : trucks, containers and the friction of circulation in the UK.', Mobilities., 12 (3). pp. 343-364.

Abstract

This paper examines logistics at work, focusing on owner-drivers in the UK container haulage industry. It draws on qualitative research conducted in south-east England in 2013 to show that the just-in-time 24/7/365 delivery required by logistics purchasers, and offered by logistics providers, is achieved in the UK logistics space through drivers displacing work, stretching time and running out of time. The location of owner-drivers in the logistics precariat is established, as is the relationship of financial precarity to the circulation of containers in the UK logistics space. Through focusing on logistics as physical real-time circulation, and not just logistics as power and discipline, the paper demonstrates the importance and effects of the friction of circulation in terrestrial (and maritime) space. It further establishes the effects of precariatisation on logistics labour in UK container haulage. These are: a crisis in labour supply, the Eastern Europeanisation of the sector and increasing pressures to illegal working practices.

Item Type:Article
Keywords:Logistics, Work, Containers, Trucks, Circulation
Full text:(VoR) Version of Record
Available under License - Creative Commons Attribution.
Download PDF (Advance online version)
(1028Kb)
Full text:(VoR) Version of Record
Available under License - Creative Commons Attribution.
Download PDF
(805Kb)
Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:https://doi.org/10.1080/17450101.2015.1087680
Publisher statement:This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Date accepted:18 August 2015
Date deposited:31 March 2016
Date of first online publication:15 October 2015
Date first made open access:No date available

Save or Share this output

Export:
Export
Look up in GoogleScholar