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What drives social in-group biases in face recognition memory? ERP evidence from the own-gender bias.

Wolff, N. and Kemter, K. and Schweinberger, S.R. and Wiese, H. (2014) 'What drives social in-group biases in face recognition memory? ERP evidence from the own-gender bias.', Social cognitive and affective neuroscience., 9 (5). pp. 580-590.

Abstract

It is well established that memory is more accurate for own-relative to other-race faces (own-race bias), which has been suggested to result from larger perceptual expertise for own-race faces. Previous studies also demonstrated better memory for own-relative to other-gender faces, which is less likely to result from differences in perceptual expertise, and rather may be related to social in-group vs out-group categorization. We examined neural correlates of the own-gender bias using event-related potentials (ERP). In a recognition memory experiment, both female and male participants remembered faces of their respective own gender more accurately compared with other-gender faces. ERPs during learning yielded significant differences between the subsequent memory effects (subsequently remembered – subsequently forgotten) for own-gender compared with other-gender faces in the occipito-temporal P2 and the central N200, whereas neither later subsequent memory effects nor ERP old/new effects at test reflected a neural correlate of the own-gender bias. We conclude that the own-gender bias is mainly related to study phase processes, which is in line with sociocognitive accounts.

Item Type:Article
Full text:(AM) Accepted Manuscript
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Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:https://doi.org/10.1093/scan/nst024
Publisher statement:This is a pre-copyedited, author-produced version of an article accepted for publication in Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience following peer review. The version of record Nicole Wolff, Kathleen Kemter, Stefan R. Schweinberger, Holger Wiese; What drives social in-group biases in face recognition memory? ERP evidence from the own-gender bias. Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience 2014; 9 (5): 580-590 is available online at: https://doi.org/10.1093/scan/nst024
Date accepted:21 February 2013
Date deposited:10 March 2017
Date of first online publication:22 March 2013
Date first made open access:No date available

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