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Higgs self-coupling measurements at a 100 TeV Hadron Collider.

Barr, Alan J. and Dolan, Matthew J. and Englert, Christoph and Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque and Spannowsky, Michael (2015) 'Higgs self-coupling measurements at a 100 TeV Hadron Collider.', Journal of high energy physics., 2015 (02). 016.

Abstract

An important physics goal of a possible next-generation high-energy hadron collider will be precision characterisation of the Higgs sector and electroweak symmetry breaking. A crucial part of understanding the nature of electroweak symmetry breaking is measuring the Higgs self-interactions. We study dihiggs production in proton-proton collisions at 100 TeV centre of mass energy in order to estimate the sensitivity such a machine would have to variations in the trilinear Higgs coupling around the Standard Model expectation. We focus on the bb¯¯γγbb¯γγ final state, including possible enhancements in sensitivity by exploiting dihiggs recoils against a hard jet. We find that it should be possible to measure the trilinear self-coupling with 40% accuracy given 3/ab and 12% with 30/ab of data.

Item Type:Article
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Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:https://doi.org/10.1007/JHEP02(2015)016
Publisher statement:This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC-BY 4.0), which permits any use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author(s) and source are credited.
Date accepted:15 January 2015
Date deposited:15 March 2017
Date of first online publication:03 February 2015
Date first made open access:No date available

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