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Strong population structure in a species manipulated by humans since the Neolithic : the European fallow deer (Dama dama dama).

Baker, K.H. and Gray, H.W.I. and Ramovs, V. and Mertzanidou, D. and Akın Pekşen, Ç. and Bilgin, C.C. and Sykes, N. and Hoelzel, A.R. (2017) 'Strong population structure in a species manipulated by humans since the Neolithic : the European fallow deer (Dama dama dama).', Heredity., 119 . pp. 16-26.

Abstract

Species that have been translocated and otherwise manipulated by humans may show patterns of population structure that reflect those interactions. At the same time, natural processes shape populations, including behavioural characteristics like dispersal potential and breeding system. In Europe, a key factor is the geography and history of climate change through the Pleistocene. During glacial maxima throughout that period, species in Europe with temperate distributions were forced south, becoming distributed among the isolated peninsulas represented by Anatolia, Italy and Iberia. Understanding modern patterns of diversity depends on understanding these historical population dynamics. Traditionally, European fallow deer (Dama dama dama) are thought to have been restricted to refugia in Anatolia and possibly Sicily and the Balkans. However, the distribution of this species was also greatly influenced by human-mediated translocations. We focus on fallow deer to better understand the relative influence of these natural and anthropogenic processes. We compared modern fallow deer putative populations across a broad geographic range using microsatellite and mitochondrial DNA loci. The results revealed highly insular populations, depauperate of genetic variation and significantly differentiated from each other. This is consistent with the expectations of drift acting on populations founded by small numbers of individuals, and reflects known founder populations in the north. However, there was also evidence for differentiation among (but not within) physically isolated regions in the south, including Iberia. In those regions we find evidence for a stronger influence from natural processes than may be expected for a species with such strong, known anthropogenic influence.

Item Type:Article
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Full text:(VoR) Version of Record
Available under License - Creative Commons Attribution.
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(1108Kb)
Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:https://doi.org/10.1038/hdy.2017.11
Publisher statement:This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Date accepted:13 February 2017
Date deposited:30 March 2017
Date of first online publication:29 March 2017
Date first made open access:No date available

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