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Durham Research Online
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Perceptions of a changing world induce hope and promote peace in intractable conflicts.

Cohen-Chen, Smadar and Crisp, Richard J. and Halperin, Eran (2015) 'Perceptions of a changing world induce hope and promote peace in intractable conflicts.', Personality and social psychology bulletin., 41 (4). pp. 498-512.

Abstract

The importance of hope in promoting conciliatory attitudes has been asserted in the field of conflict resolution. However, little is known about conditions inducing hope, especially in intractable conflicts, where reference to the outgroup may backfire. In the current research, five studies yielded convergent support for the hypothesis that hope for peace stems from a general perception of the world as changing. In Study 1, coders observed associations between belief in a changing world, hope regarding peace, and support for concessions. Study 2 revealed the hypothesized relations using self-reported measures. Studies 3 and 4 established causality by instilling a perception of the world as changing (vs. unchanging) using narrative and drawing manipulations. Study 5 compared the changing world message with a control condition during conflict escalation. Across studies, although the specific context was not referred to, the belief in a changing world increased support for concessions through hope for peace.

Item Type:Article
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Available under License - Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial.
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Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:https://doi.org/10.1177/0146167215573210
Publisher statement:This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License (http://www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) which permits non-commercial use, reproduction and distribution of the work without further permission provided the original work is attributed as specified on the SAGE and Open Access page (https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/open-access-at-sage).
Date accepted:08 January 2015
Date deposited:05 September 2017
Date of first online publication:24 February 2015
Date first made open access:No date available

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