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Durham Research Online
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Anxiety in Williams syndrome : the role of social behaviour, executive functions and change over time.

Ng-Cordell, Elise and Hanley, Mary and Alyssa, Kelly and Riby, Deborah M. (2018) 'Anxiety in Williams syndrome : the role of social behaviour, executive functions and change over time.', Journal of autism and developmental disorders., 48 (3). pp. 796-808.

Abstract

Anxiety is a prevalent mental health issue for individuals with Williams syndrome (WS). Relatively little is known about the developmental course of anxiety, or how it links with core features of WS, namely social and executive functioning (EF). In this study, parent-reports of anxiety were compared across a 4-year period (N = 17), and links between anxiety, social and EF were explored from concurrent parent-reports (N = 26). Results indicated that high anxiety persisted over time, and anxiety was related to impairments in both social and executive functioning. Importantly, results indicated that impairments in EFs may drive the links between anxiety and social functioning. This timely investigation provides new insights into anxiety in WS and highlights potential areas for intervention.

Item Type:Article
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Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:https://doi.org/10.1007/s10803-017-3357-0
Publisher statement:This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.
Date accepted:15 October 2017
Date deposited:27 October 2017
Date of first online publication:09 November 2017
Date first made open access:23 November 2017

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