Cookies

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. By continuing to browse this repository, you give consent for essential cookies to be used. You can read more about our Privacy and Cookie Policy.


Durham Research Online
You are in:

Internationalisation in higher education – an internationalist perspective.

Byram, M. (2018) 'Internationalisation in higher education – an internationalist perspective.', On the horizon., 26 (2). pp. 148-156.

Abstract

Purpose This paper aims to argue for the significance of internationalism for the internationalisation of higher education. It analyses some conceptualisations and definitions of internationalisation before explaining the concept of internationalism, and variations of it, to demonstrate that internationalism has a moral dimension which could, and the author argues, provide a normative value base for the processes of internationalisation. Design/methodology/approach This paper is a cross-disciplinary, conceptual exploration. Findings The argument concludes with a listing of principles which should give a moral direction to internationalisation. Research limitations/implications The approach proposed is the basis for evaluations of different aspects of internationalisation such as the design and implementation of curricula. Practical implications The approach taken here, if implemented, would lead to changes in curricula and processes of internationalisation. Social implications The impact of internationalisation, and particularly of student mobility as an aspect of it, is already significant, and the perspective presented here would lead to more coherent interactions in mobility situations. Originality/value Using the neglected concept of internationalism brings a new perspective and challenge to internationalisation.

Item Type:Article
Full text:(AM) Accepted Manuscript
Download PDF
(224Kb)
Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:https://doi.org/10.1108/OTH-11-2017-0090
Publisher statement:This article is © Emerald Group Publishing and permission has been granted for this version to appear here http://dro.dur.ac.uk/23931. Emerald does not grant permission for this article to be further copied/distributed or hosted elsewhere without the express permission from Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Date accepted:05 January 2018
Date deposited:22 January 2018
Date of first online publication:04 June 2018
Date first made open access:04 June 2018

Save or Share this output

Export:
Export
Look up in GoogleScholar