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Durham Research Online
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When subjective experiences matter : power increases reliance on ease of retrieval.

Weick, Mario and Guinote, Ana (2008) 'When subjective experiences matter : power increases reliance on ease of retrieval.', Journal of personality and social psychology., 94 (6). pp. 956-970.

Abstract

Past research on power focused exclusively on declarative knowledge and neglected the role of subjective experiences. Five studies tested the hypothesis that power increases reliance on the experienced ease or difficulty that accompanies thought generation. Across a variety of targets, such as attitudes, leisure-time satisfaction, and stereotyping, and with different operationalizations of power, including priming, trait dominance, and actual power in managerial contexts, power consistently increased reliance on the ease of retrieval. These effects remained 1 week later and were not mediated by mood, quality of the retrieved information, or number of counterarguments. These findings indicate that powerful individuals construe their judgments on the basis of momentary subjective experiences and do not necessarily rely on core attitudes or prior knowledge, such as stereotypes.

Item Type:Article
Full text:(AM) Accepted Manuscript
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Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:https://doi.org/10.1037/0022-3514.94.6.956
Publisher statement:© 2008 APA, all rights reserved. This article may not exactly replicate the final version published in the APA journal. It is not the copy of record.
Date accepted:No date available
Date deposited:19 September 2018
Date of first online publication:June 2008
Date first made open access:No date available

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