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A critical review of the role of milk and other dairy products in the development of obesity in children and adolescents.

Dougkas, Anestis and Barr, Suzanne and Reddy, Sheela and Summerbell, Carolyn D. (2019) 'A critical review of the role of milk and other dairy products in the development of obesity in children and adolescents.', Nutrition research reviews., 32 (1). pp. 106-127.

Abstract

Existing reviews suggest that milk and other dairy products do not play a role in the development of obesity in childhood, but they do make an important contribution to children’s nutrient intake. It is thus curious that public health advice on the consumption of dairy products for children is often perceived as unclear. The present review aimed to provide an overview of the totality of the evidence on the association between milk and other dairy products, and obesity and indicators of adiposity, in children. Our search identified forty-three cross-sectional studies, thirty-one longitudinal cohort studies and twenty randomised controlled trials. We found that milk and other dairy products are consistently found to be not associated, or inversely associated, with obesity and indicators of adiposity in children. Adjustment for energy intake tended to change inverse associations to neutral. Also, we found little evidence to suggest that the relationship varied by type of milk or dairy product, or age of the children, although there was a dearth of evidence for young children. Only nine of the ninety-four studies found a positive association between milk and other dairy products and body fatness. There may be some plausible mechanisms underlying the effect of milk and other dairy products on adiposity that influence energy and fat balance, possibly through fat absorption, appetite or metabolic activity of gut microbiota. In conclusion, there is little evidence to support a concern to limit the consumption of milk and other dairy products for children on the grounds that they may promote obesity.

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:The supplementary material for this article can be found at https://doi.org/10.1017/S0954422418000227
Full text:Publisher-imposed embargo
(AM) Accepted Manuscript
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Full text:Publisher-imposed embargo
(AM) Accepted Manuscript
File format - PDF (Supplementary material)
(681Kb)
Full text:(VoR) Version of Record
Available under License - Creative Commons Attribution.
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Full text:(VoR) Version of Record
Available under License - Creative Commons Attribution.
Download PDF
(647Kb)
Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:https://doi.org/10.1017/s0954422418000227
Publisher statement:© The Authors 2018 This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Date accepted:25 September 2018
Date deposited:05 October 2018
Date of first online publication:27 November 2018
Date first made open access:No date available

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