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The restorative effect of work after unemployment : an intraindividual analysis of subjective well-being recovery through reemployment.

Zhou, Ying. and Zou, Min. and Woods, Stephen A. and Wu, Chia-Huei (2019) 'The restorative effect of work after unemployment : an intraindividual analysis of subjective well-being recovery through reemployment.', Journal of applied psychology., 104 (9). pp. 1195-1206.

Abstract

Previous research shows that unemployment has lasting detrimental effects on individuals’ subjective well-being. However, the issue of how well-being evolves after individuals switch back into the labor force has received little theoretical and empirical attention. This study examines the extent to which reemployment restores individuals’ subjective well-being following a period of unemployment. Applying fixed effects models to the large-scale longitudinal data from the British Household Panel Survey, we find that recovery of subjective well-being upon reemployment is fast, complete and enduring, even when individuals take less favorable employment options to return to work. By contrast, transitions into economic inactivity following unemployment are accompanied by persistent scars on subsequent well-being trajectories. This study advances our understanding of well-being development over the entire employment–unemployment–reemployment cycle.

Item Type:Article
Full text:(AM) Accepted Manuscript
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Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:https://doi.org/10.1037/apl0000393
Publisher statement:© 2018 APA, all rights reserved. This article may not exactly replicate the final version published in the APA journal. It is not the copy of record.
Date accepted:19 December 2018
Date deposited:18 January 2019
Date of first online publication:18 February 2019
Date first made open access:18 February 2019

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