Cookies

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. By continuing to browse this repository, you give consent for essential cookies to be used. You can read more about our Privacy and Cookie Policy.


Durham Research Online
You are in:

Family, school and job – the impact of socio-economic background and school segregation on labour market outcomes : evidence from the Longitudinal Study Next Steps in England.

Shao, Xin (2019) 'Family, school and job – the impact of socio-economic background and school segregation on labour market outcomes : evidence from the Longitudinal Study Next Steps in England.', in Imagining Better Education: Conference Proceedings 2018. Durham, England: Durham University, School of Education, pp. 200-212. Imagining Better Education.

Abstract

Early access to the labour market in the UK and other developed countries for young people is still clearly stratified according to socio-economic origins and prior educational attainment. However, these factors are difficult to change, are not the only factors creating stratified outcomes, and may in any case be mediated by other factors such as school segregation and peer influence. In recent years, there have been increasing policy concerns about social mobility in the UK. This study uses the longitudinal study Next Steps to analyse the trajectories of a generation currently in their late 20s. It focuses on how two different factors - socio-economic background and school segregation - are related to occupational status in early adulthood from the perspective of social justice and the equity and equality of education. The paper provides a review of the literature on the topic and describes the methods used in this study.

Item Type:Book chapter
Full text:(VoR) Version of Record
Download PDF
(149Kb)
Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:https://www.dur.ac.uk/education/
Date accepted:No date available
Date deposited:15 March 2019
Date of first online publication:2019
Date first made open access:No date available

Save or Share this output

Export:
Export
Look up in GoogleScholar