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Student pro-sociality : measuring institutional and individual factors that predict pro-social behaviour at university.

Stiff, Chris and Rosenthal-Stott, Harriet E. S. and Wake, Stephanie and Woodward, Amelia (2019) 'Student pro-sociality : measuring institutional and individual factors that predict pro-social behaviour at university.', Current psychology., 38 (4). pp. 920-930.

Abstract

Students operate within a bounded social context and often face decisions regarding whether to pursue selfish or group-level benefit. Yet little work has examined what predicts their behaviour towards fellow students. This work addresses this gap by investigating what factors may predict students’ performance of pro-social actions at university, and how an institution may maximise such behaviour. Study 1 created the student pro-sociality scale, used to measure these tendencies in students. In study 2, 428 students from 25 UK universities took part an online survey study using this scale, and several other pre-existing measures of possible predictors. Analysis suggested that of those factors examined, role clarity, affective commitment, empathy, and perspective-taking emerged as the most influential. This first foray into this area can now inspire further research in finding the effective ways of fostering pro-social behaviour in students.

Item Type:Article
Full text:(VoR) Version of Record
Available under License - Creative Commons Attribution.
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Full text:(VoR) Version of Record
Available under License - Creative Commons Attribution.
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Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:https://doi.org/10.1007/s12144-019-00256-3
Publisher statement:© The Author(s) 2019. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.
Date accepted:18 April 2019
Date deposited:09 May 2019
Date of first online publication:18 April 2019
Date first made open access:No date available

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