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The configuration of Northern Hemisphere ice sheets through the Quaternary.

Batchelor, C.L. and Margold, M. and Krapp, M. and Murton, D.K. and Dalton, A.S. and Gibbard, P.L. and Stokes, C.R. and Murton, J.B. and Manica, A. (2019) 'The configuration of Northern Hemisphere ice sheets through the Quaternary.', Nature communications., 10 . p. 3713.

Abstract

Our understanding of how global climatic changes are translated into ice-sheet fluctuations and sea-level change is currently limited by a lack of knowledge of the configuration of ice sheets prior to the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Here, we compile a synthesis of empirical data and numerical modelling results related to pre-LGM ice sheets to produce new hypotheses regarding their extent in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) at 17 time-slices that span the Quaternary. Our reconstructions illustrate pronounced ice-sheet asymmetry within the last glacial cycle and significant variations in ice-marginal positions between older glacial cycles. We find support for a significant reduction in the extent of the Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS) during MIS 3, implying that global sea levels may have been 30–40m higher than most previous estimates. Our ice-sheet reconstructions illustrate the current state-of-the-art knowledge of pre-LGM ice sheets and provide a conceptual framework to interpret NH landscape evolution.

Item Type:Article
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Full text:Publisher-imposed embargo
(AM) Accepted Manuscript
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Available under License - Creative Commons Attribution.
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Full text:(VoR) Version of Record
Available under License - Creative Commons Attribution.
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(2626Kb)
Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-11601-2
Publisher statement:Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Date accepted:25 July 2019
Date deposited:29 July 2019
Date of first online publication:16 August 2019
Date first made open access:No date available

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