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"Why sit ye here and Die"? Counter-hegemonic histories of the black female intellectual in nineteenth century America.

Fraser, R. and Griffin, M. (2020) '"Why sit ye here and Die"? Counter-hegemonic histories of the black female intellectual in nineteenth century America.', Journal of American studies., 54 (5). pp. 1005-1031.

Abstract

This paper examines the work and lives of black female activist-Intellectuals in the years before the formation of the National Association of Colored Women’s Clubs (NACWC) in 1896. Looking deeper at arguments originally made by Maria Stewart concerning the denial of black women's ambitions and limiting potential in their working lives, the analysis employs the work of the Italian Marxist Antonio Gramsci, in particular his notion of the intellectual, to help reflect on the centrality of these black women in the development of an early counterhegemonic movement.

Item Type:Article
Full text:(AM) Accepted Manuscript
Available under License - Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives.
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Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:https://doi.org/10.1017/S0021875820000389
Publisher statement:This article has been published in a revised form in Journal of American Studies http://doi.org/10.1017/S0021875820000389. This version is published under a Creative Commons CC-BY-NC-ND. No commercial re-distribution or re-use allowed. Derivative works cannot be distributed. COPYRIGHT: © Cambridge University Press 2020.
Date accepted:20 December 2019
Date deposited:09 January 2020
Date of first online publication:20 February 2020
Date first made open access:09 January 2020

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