Cookies

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. By continuing to browse this repository, you give consent for essential cookies to be used. You can read more about our Privacy and Cookie Policy.


Durham Research Online
You are in:

Electron Compton scattering and the measurement of electron momentum distributions in solids.

Talmantaite, A. and Hunt, M.R.C. and Mendis, B.G. (2020) 'Electron Compton scattering and the measurement of electron momentum distributions in solids.', Journal of microscopy., 279 (3). pp. 185-188.

Abstract

Electron Compton scattering is a technique that gives information on the electron momentum density of states and is used to characterize the ground state electronic structure in solids. Extracting the momentum density of states requires us to assume the so‐called ‘impulse approximation’, which is valid for large energy losses. Here, the robustness of the impulse approximation in the low energy transfer regime is tested and confirmed on amorphous carbon films. Compared to traditional Compton measurements, this provides additional benefits of more efficient data collection and a simplified way to probe valence electrons, which govern solid state bonding. However, a potential complication is the increased background from the plasmon signal. To overcome this, a novel plasmon background subtraction routine is proposed for samples that are resistant to beam damage.

Item Type:Article
Full text:(VoR) Version of Record
Available under License - Creative Commons Attribution.
Download PDF (Advance online version)
(945Kb)
Full text:(VoR) Version of Record
Available under License - Creative Commons Attribution.
Download PDF
(1046Kb)
Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:https://doi.org/10.1111/jmi.12854
Publisher statement:© The Authors. Journal of Microscopy published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Royal Microscopical Society. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Date accepted:07 December 2019
Date deposited:10 January 2020
Date of first online publication:06 January 2020
Date first made open access:10 January 2020

Save or Share this output

Export:
Export
Look up in GoogleScholar