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Durham Research Online
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Planning and Public Health professionals’ experiences of using the planning system to regulate hot food takeaway outlets in England : a qualitative study.

Keeble, M. and Burgoine, T. and White, M. and Summerbell, C.D. and Cummins, S. and Adams, J. (2020) 'Planning and Public Health professionals’ experiences of using the planning system to regulate hot food takeaway outlets in England : a qualitative study.', Health & place., 67 .

Abstract

Takeaway food outlets offer limited seating and sell hot food to be consumed away from their premises. They typically serve energy-dense, nutrient-poor food. National planning guidelines in England offer the potential for local planning policies to promote healthier food environments through regulation of takeaway food outlets. Around half of English local government areas use this approach, but little is known about the process of adoption. We aimed to explore experiences and perceived success of planning policy adoption. In 2018 we recruited Planning and Public Health professionals from 16 local government areas in England and completed 26 telephone interviews. We analysed data with a thematic analysis approach. Participants felt that planning policy adoption was appropriate and can successfully regulate takeaway food outlets with the intention to improve health. They identified several facilitators and barriers towards adoption. Facilitators included internal co-operation between Planning and Public Health departments, and precedent for planning policy adoption set elsewhere. Barriers included “nanny-state” criticism, and difficulty demonstrating planning policy effectiveness. These could be considered in future guidelines to support widespread planning policy adoption.

Item Type:Article
Full text:Publisher-imposed embargo
(AM) Accepted Manuscript
Available under License - Creative Commons Attribution 4.0.
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Available under License - Creative Commons Attribution 4.0.
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Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.healthplace.2020.102305
Publisher statement:© 2020 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Date accepted:10 February 2020
Date deposited:18 February 2020
Date of first online publication:06 March 2020
Date first made open access:18 March 2021

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