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The simple and courageous course : industrial patronage of basic research at the University of Chicago, 1945–1953.

Martin, Joseph D. (2020) 'The simple and courageous course : industrial patronage of basic research at the University of Chicago, 1945–1953.', Isis., 111 (4). pp. 697-716.

Abstract

The University of Chicago was the site of a remarkable ideological alignment after World War II. Its chancellor, Robert Maynard Hutchins, was one of mid-century America’s fiercest critics of science and of the moral stature of scientists. His administration nevertheless forged a détente with Chicago’s physical scientists in the process of establishing the Institutes for Basic Research, which consolidated the personnel and resources the Manhattan Project had brought to campus. Chicago’s left-leaning group of scientists and administrators then made common cause with a series of conservative industrial interests in order to fund the new institutes, on the basis that industry had an obligation to support basic research. This intersection of otherwise divergent ideological strands exposes the institutional malleability of patronage relationships in the years after World War II.

Item Type:Article
Full text:(AM) Accepted Manuscript
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Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:https://doi.org/10.1086/711949
Publisher statement:© 2020 by The History of Science Society
Date accepted:20 March 2020
Date deposited:20 March 2020
Date of first online publication:06 January 2020
Date first made open access:08 January 2021

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