Cookies

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. By continuing to browse this repository, you give consent for essential cookies to be used. You can read more about our Privacy and Cookie Policy.


Durham Research Online
You are in:

Gas-phase synthesis and characterisation of the methyl-2,2-dicyanoacetate anion using photoelectron imaging and dipole-bound state autodetachment.

Anstöter, Cate S. and Verlet, Jan R. R. (2020) 'Gas-phase synthesis and characterisation of the methyl-2,2-dicyanoacetate anion using photoelectron imaging and dipole-bound state autodetachment.', Journal of physical chemistry letters., 11 (15). pp. 6456-6462.

Abstract

The methyl-2,2-dicyanoacetate anion is synthesised in an electrospray ionisation source through a gas-phase reaction involving tetracyanoethylene and methanol. Photoelectron imaging is used to determine the isomeric form of the product. The photoelectron spectra and angular distributions are only consistent with a single isomer. Additionally, mode-specific vibrational autodetachment is observed. This can be correlated with the emission from a photoexcited dipole-bound state by considering the IR spectrum of the neutral molecule, adding further confirmation of the isomeric form and providing a binding energy of the dipole-bound state. Our experiments show how conventional photoelectron imaging can be used to determine detailed information about gas-phase reaction products.

Item Type:Article
Full text:(AM) Accepted Manuscript
Download PDF
(517Kb)
Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.jpclett.0c02036
Publisher statement:This document is the Accepted Manuscript version of a Published Work that appeared in final form in the Journal of physical chemistry letters, copyright © American Chemical Society after peer review and technical editing by the publisher. To access the final edited and published work see https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.jpclett.0c02036
Date accepted:20 July 2020
Date deposited:24 July 2020
Date of first online publication:20 July 2020
Date first made open access:20 July 2021

Save or Share this output

Export:
Export
Look up in GoogleScholar