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The importance of spatial differences in total factor productivity: the example of New Zealand, 2001-2016

Harris, Richard I. D. (2021) 'The importance of spatial differences in total factor productivity: the example of New Zealand, 2001-2016.', Regional studies., 55 (7). pp. 1209-1227.

Abstract

Using firm-level panel data and estimating production functions for 37 industries, covering the 2001–16 period, this paper finds that firms in the Wellington region of New Zealand are on average about twice as productive as those in the rest of the South Island (which has the lowest average productivity). As to whether ‘place’ effects are the major explanation for such spatial differences or if ‘firm mix’ is more important, this study finds that agglomeration plays only a minor role in determining firm-level productivity levels, while the importance of spatial factors in accounting for the differential between productivity in Wellington and other areas was generally very small.

Item Type:Article
Full text:(AM) Accepted Manuscript
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Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:https://doi.org/10.1080/00343404.2020.1869204
Publisher statement:This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Regional studies on 8 February 2021, available online: https://doi.org/10.1080/00343404.2020.1869204
Date accepted:07 December 2020
Date deposited:08 December 2020
Date of first online publication:08 February 2021
Date first made open access:08 August 2022

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