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A Biography of power: research and excavations at the Iron Age 'oppidum' of Bagendon, Gloucestershire (1979-2017)

Moore, T. (2020) 'A Biography of power: research and excavations at the Iron Age 'oppidum' of Bagendon, Gloucestershire (1979-2017).', Oxford: Archaeopress.

Abstract

This volume explores the changing nature of power and identity from the Iron Age to Roman period in Britain. Presenting detailed excavation results and integrating a range of comprehensive specialist studies, A Biography of Power provides fresh insights into the origins and nature of one of the lesser-known, but perhaps most significant, Late Iron Age oppida in Britain: Bagendon in Gloucestershire. Combining the results of a large-scale geophysical survey, with analysis of both historic and new excavations, this volume reassesses Iron Age occupation at Bagendon, revealing evidence for diverse artisanal activities and complex regional exchange networks that saw livestock, and people, travelling to Bagendon from west of the Severn. The results of excavation of two morphologically unusual, banjo-like enclosures, and of one of the previously unexamined dykes, has revealed that the Bagendon oppidum had earlier origins and more complex roles than previously envisaged. The volume also provides new insights into the nature of the Iron Age and Roman landscape in which Bagendon was situated. Detailing the discovery of two, previously unknown, Roman villas at Bagendon, this research also demonstrates the continued significance of this landscape in the early Roman province. This volume redefines Bagendon as a landscape of power, which offers important insights into the changing nature of societies from the Middle Iron Age to Roman period. It calls for a radical reassessment of how we define oppida complexes and their socio-political importance at the turn of the 1st millennium BC. Contains contributions from Sophia Adams, Michael J. Allen, Sam Bithell, Loïc Boscher, Cameron Clegg, G.B. Dannell, Lorne Elliott, Elizabeth Foulds, Freddie Foulds, Christopher Green, Derek Hamilton, Colin Haselgrove, Yvonne Inall, Tina Jakob, Mandy Jay, Sally Kellett, Robert Kenyon, Mark Landon, Marcos Martinón-Torres, Edward McSloy, Janet Montgomery, J.A. Morley-Stone, Geoff Nowell, Charlotte O’Brien, Chris Ottley, Cynthia Poole, Richard Reece, Harry Robson, Ruth Shaffrey, John Shepherd, Jane Timby, Dirk Visser, D.F. Williams, Steven Willis.

Item Type:Book
Full text:(VoR) Version of Record
Available under License - Creative Commons Attribution 4.0.
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Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:https://www.archaeopress.com/ArchaeopressShop/Public/displayProductDetail.asp?id={1B0411B5-ED20-4DE8-B2BA-BAA770DE202F}
Publisher statement:This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
Date accepted:05 February 2020
Date deposited:03 February 2021
Date of first online publication:07 September 2020
Date first made open access:03 February 2021

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