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Host state reactions to home state diaspora engagement policies: Rethinking state sovereignty and limits of diaspora governance

Baser, Bahar and Féron, Élise (2022) 'Host state reactions to home state diaspora engagement policies: Rethinking state sovereignty and limits of diaspora governance.', Global Networks, 22 (2). pp. 226-241.

Abstract

During the last few decades, institutions, policies, and other state-sponsored mechanisms linking home states and diasporas have expanded well beyond traditional areas. Numerous states have established diaspora engagement policies and institutions to tap diaspora resources and maximize their political, economic, and cultural interests. Previous research largely focused on these policies’ motivations and their impact on diasporas, with little attention being paid to the host states’ context. How do host states react to other states’ diaspora engagement policies within their borders? Where do host states draw the line for other states’ involvement in their territory? In this article, we examine Turkey's diaspora engagement initiatives in European countries, and zero in on host states’ reactions to these extraterritorial activities. We argue that diaspora engagement has limits and its scope is determined by the foreign and domestic political processes of the host states and their concern over their sovereignty and security.

Item Type:Article
Full text:Publisher-imposed embargo until 02 September 2023.
(AM) Accepted Manuscript
File format - PDF
(357Kb)
Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:https://doi.org/10.1111/glob.12341
Publisher statement:This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Baser, Bahar & Féron, Élise (2022). Host state reactions to home state diaspora engagement policies: Rethinking state sovereignty and limits of diaspora governance. Global Networks 22(2): 226-241, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/glob.12341. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions. This article may not be enhanced, enriched or otherwise transformed into a derivative work, without express permission from Wiley or by statutory rights under applicable legislation. Copyright notices must not be removed, obscured or modified. The article must be linked to Wiley’s version of record on Wiley Online Library and any embedding, framing or otherwise making available the article or pages thereof by third parties from platforms, services and websites other than Wiley Online Library must be prohibited.
Date accepted:15 July 2021
Date deposited:06 September 2021
Date of first online publication:02 September 2021
Date first made open access:02 September 2023

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