Cookies

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. By continuing to browse this repository, you give consent for essential cookies to be used. You can read more about our Privacy and Cookie Policy.


Durham Research Online
You are in:

‘Seven Shillings is Not Exactly the Millennium’: Economic Liberalism and the Campaign for a Miners' Minimum Wage in the Durham Coalfield to 1914

Mates, Lewis (2013) '‘Seven Shillings is Not Exactly the Millennium’: Economic Liberalism and the Campaign for a Miners' Minimum Wage in the Durham Coalfield to 1914.', Historical Studies in Industrial Relations, 34 (1). pp. 49-81.

Abstract

The Durham Miners’ Association (DMA) was one of the best established, wealthiest and largest trade unions in Britain. Yet economic liberalism, specifically that miners’ wages had to be determined by coal prices, dominated the thinking of the DMA’s leaders as well as many ordinary Durham miners. The minimum wage was an indispensable way for radicals to attack these notions. As the Liberal-dominated Durham leadership remained hostile, the task of winning converts to the minimum wage fell to the union’s radical activists. This article explores the rank and file movements that coalesced around advocacy of the minimum wage from their re-emergence in summer 1911, and considers the debates on the votes for national strike action on the issue in 1912. It charts the campaigns’ changing aims, achievements and weaknesses after the minimum wage was formally won.

Item Type:Article
Full text:(AM) Accepted Manuscript
Download PDF
(353Kb)
Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:https://doi.org/10.3828/hsir.2013.34.3
Publisher statement:© Liverpool University Press 2013
Date accepted:No date available
Date deposited:10 September 2021
Date of first online publication:2013
Date first made open access:10 September 2021

Save or Share this output

Export:
Export
Look up in GoogleScholar