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Meta-analysis examining the effects of electronic storybooks on language and literacy outcomes for children in grades Pre-K to grade 2

Savva, Marilena and Higgins, Steven E. and Beckmann, Nadin (2022) 'Meta-analysis examining the effects of electronic storybooks on language and literacy outcomes for children in grades Pre-K to grade 2.', Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, 38 (2). pp. 526-564.

Abstract

Background The array of availability of diverse digital reading applications, the mixed results emerging from small-scale experimental studies, as well as the long-standing tradition and range of known positive developmental outcomes gained from adult-child storybook reading warrant an investigation into electronic storybooks (e-books) by performing a meta-analysis, which includes recent studies. Objectives The overall purpose of this meta-analysis, is to examine the impact of e-book reading on language and literacy development of young children when compared to traditional reading of print books with or without adult scaffolding in a structured and controlled environment. Methods This meta-analysis includes experimental studies published between 2008 and 2021 with a target population of 3–8 year-olds (n = 2.317). Results and Conclusions Analyses indicated a small positive effect for e-books when compared to print books on language and literacy development (g = 0.25; 95% CI = [0.09, 0.42]). A moderate positive effect was found for vocabulary learning, (g = 0.40; 95% CI = [0.10, 0.69]), especially in relation to expressive vocabulary (g = 0.54; 95% CI = [0.08, 1.00]). In addition, we found a significant positive correlation between multimedia e-books and the development of coderelated skills. However, no significant differences were found between e-book and print book reading in relation to story comprehension. Implications Findings showed that digital features combined with adult scaffolding produced significant positive effects when compared to traditional print book reading with adult support. The findings have practical ramifications, since they can help researchers and educators identify which digital features have the greatest influence on improving children's language and literacy skills when engaging with e-books.

Item Type:Article
Full text:Publisher-imposed embargo until 15 November 2023.
(AM) Accepted Manuscript
File format - PDF
(1402Kb)
Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:https://doi.org/10.1111/jcal.12623
Publisher statement:This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Savva, M., Higgins, S. E. & Beckmann, N. (2022). Meta-analysis examining the effects of electronic storybooks on language and literacy outcomes for children in grades Pre-K to grade 2. Journal of Computer Assisted Learning 38(2): 526-564, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/jcal.12623. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.
Date accepted:06 September 2021
Date deposited:06 October 2021
Date of first online publication:15 November 2021
Date first made open access:15 November 2023

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