Cookies

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. By continuing to browse this repository, you give consent for essential cookies to be used. You can read more about our Privacy and Cookie Policy.


Durham Research Online
You are in:

Adolescent development of interethnic attitudes following a social intervention to increase intergroup contact: The moderating role of affective forecasting.

van Zalk, M. H. W. and Kotzur, P. F. and Schmid, K. and Al Ramiah, A. and Hewstone, M. (2021) 'Adolescent development of interethnic attitudes following a social intervention to increase intergroup contact: The moderating role of affective forecasting.', Developmental Psychology, 57 (6). pp. 1000-1017.

Abstract

This longitudinal, quasi-experimental field study investigated affective forecasting as a moderator of positive intergroup contact effects among adolescents. We also examined a novel mediating mechanism that underlies this effect, namely accuracy of perceived outgroup willingness for intergroup contact. Three annual waves of survey data were used from 1,169 adolescents (Mage = 13.88 at Wave 1; 50% girls; 66% White British, 44% Asian British) whose schools were merged, in a unique intervention that resulted in one school where ethnic groups were evenly mixed (i.e., balanced school) and two White British majority schools (i.e., majority skewed schools). Results showed that positive intergroup contact and attitudes improved more in the balanced school than in the majority skewed schools. In all schools, change in adolescents’ positive intergroup contact predicted change in positive intergroup attitudes indirectly via (a) increased accuracy of perceived outgroup willingness for contact and (b) reduced intergroup anxiety. Indirect effects via accuracy of perceived contact willingness were stronger for adolescents who made more negative affective forecasts than for other adolescents. These moderated mediation effects were stronger in the balanced school than in the majority skewed schools. Thus, more balanced ethnic mixing in schools seemed to directly enhance positive intergroup relations and attitudes for all adolescents, but to particularly benefit adolescents who made more negative affective forecasts about positive contact before the school merger. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)

Item Type:Article
Full text:(AM) Accepted Manuscript
Download PDF
(559Kb)
Status:Peer-reviewed
Publisher Web site:https://doi.org/10.1037/dev0001194
Publisher statement:© American Psychological Association, 2021. This paper is not the copy of record and may not exactly replicate the authoritative document published in the APA journal. The final article is available, upon publication, at: https://doi.org/10.1037/dev0001194
Date accepted:No date available
Date deposited:19 October 2021
Date of first online publication:June 2021
Date first made open access:19 October 2021

Save or Share this output

Export:
Export
Look up in GoogleScholar